Why Farm Africa is helping women set up their own goat rearing enterprises

Farm  Africa

Farm Africa

Premium Supplier 22nd November 2018

Why Farm Africa is helping women set up their own goat rearing enterprises

Meet Hailo. Hailo, pictured above, lives in rural South Omo, Ethiopia – one of the poorest, most marginalised and malnourished areas in eastern Africa. The harsh and unpredictable climate there can make it impossible to grow enough crops or keep cattle healthy. With little food and no other ways to earn an income, it’s no surprise that families are often left on the brink of critical poverty.
Hailo is the mother of three children. She was married, but sadly her husband passed away a few years ago, so she is raising her family on her own. However, Hailo is a woman who never gives up. She simply can’t. Her children cannot survive without her.
That’s why international charity Farm Africa has just launched Livestock for livelihoods, a new goat rearing project based in South Omo and Uganda’s Karamoja region. The project is funded with UK aid from the UK government.
Livestock for livelihoods supports thousands of strong, determined women like Hailo to build successful goat rearing businesses that permanently lift them and their families out of poverty.
Goats are amazing animals. They are easy to care for and are hardy animals that can survive in extremely dry conditions. Rearing goats can give women a reliable income all year round, and provide a source of nutritious milk for their children to drink.
"When my goats breed and their numbers increase, I will have a continuous supply of milk for my children." Hailo
Hailo, and women like her, will also learn how to earn additional money by making goods like cheese and butter to sell at the market. Their current gruelling workloads will reduce, whilst their incomes will increase dramatically. And they will no longer be as vulnerable to the devastating effects of drought.
Farm Africa support farmers to learn all the skills they need to thrive, long after the project ends. So, when the women have started to build their goat herds, they will pass on some of their goats' kids to another woman in their community – so they too can have the chance to build a more secure, prosperous future for their family.