Chilled Lobster Bisque

Charles Saumarez

Charles Saumarez

21st February 2011

Chilled Lobster Bisque

The American, or Maine lobster, thought to be the biggest and best of its kind, along with the smaller European lobster are the two most popular varieties amongst the species that are used in recipes. Take your cooking to the next level with the following Chilled Lobster Bisque recipe. This is my own lobster bisque recipe. I developed it in one London restaurant I was working in, by trial and error. The method I give is in my own words, and taken from my portfolio to which I am forever adding!

Ingredients

  • Having collected a whole load of old lobster shells, I roasted these off at a fairly high heat. I put the roasted shells into the Hobart Mixer and crushed them down. In the roasting tray, I deglazed this with a mixture of white wine and Brandy, reducing this down to a fine glace. In the meantime in large frying pans, I coloured off in oil the following, all rough cut:
  • Onion
  • Carrot
  • Leek, green included
  • Celery
  • Fennel
  • Mushrooms
  • Whole Garlic heads, cut in half
  • I added all these to a big pot along with the now crushed lobster shells and reduced alcohol. I added more wine and brandy to the original vegetable pans and reduced in the same way. The aromats I added were:
  • Fennel seeds
  • White peppercorns
  • Coriander seeds
  • Star Anise
  • Cloves
  • Orange and lemon Rind
  • Thyme
  • Bay leaf
  • With everything in a big pot, I topped up with water. The reason for this is because it is purer than stock and would therefore create a cleaner infusion of all those lovely ingredients. Once on the heat, this was brought to the boil and skimmed of all the scum and impurities which rose to the surface. It was then reduced to a gentle simmer and left for about 3-4 hours to develop a good distinctive taste. It was removed from the heat and allowed to infuse for about half an hour before being passed and chilled. Later on I tested it. The mix was now darker, more gelatinous like and very treacle like. I let it down with some whipping cream and adjusted the seasoning, mainly with white pepper. The end result however was of a very deep, rich roasted lobster taste. It left a slightly nutty pungent yet pleasant taste in the back of my throat though.
  • One day, I might try this again however as a consomm√©. This will be done by simmering and infusing for slightly less amount of time, and for the raft, I might use prawn flesh, chicken meat, and maybe red grapefruit with the usual egg whites. Also plenty of fresh soft herbs including parsley, tarragon, chives, dill and chervil for that extra freshness!

Method

See ingredients