Roast Dorset rose veal sweet bread Purple sprouting, confit lemon, veal jus

Sam Moody

Sam Moody

25th February 2014

Roast Dorset rose veal sweet bread Purple sprouting, confit lemon, veal jus

Sam Moody shares a dish from his current menu for The Staff Canteen Live 2014.

The Dish is off our carte, sweet breads come on and off the menu all year round.

Also it’s great to use bits from the whole animal, if we have veal loin on the lunch menu, on a busy week we might sell 5 or 6 middles, it’s import to think about using up the rest of the animal as well, including the offal.

Ingredients

  • Per portion
  • • 60g of trimmed, blanched sweet bread
  • • 3-5 blanched PSB
  • • 3x ½ candied almonds
  • • Shallot Vinaigrette
  • • Confit lemon, diced, pureed
  • • Caramelised shallot puree
  • • Finely chopped, raw shallot
  • • Deep fried broccoli
  • • Turkey jus
  • Lemon confit/puree
  • • 12 lemons, lightly scored
  • • Water
  • • Stock syrup
  • Turkey Jus
  • • 2 turkey legs chopped, small
  • • 1 onions cut into rounds
  • • 1 Garlic head cut into half
  • • Bunch of thyme
  • • 200ml Vegetable oil
  • • 2 l Chicken stock
  • • Water, to cover
  • Candied Almonds
  • • 100g Almonds
  • • 500g water
  • • 500g sugar
  • Caramelised Shallot vinaigrette
  • • 500g Chopped shallots,
  • • 500g extra virgin olive oil
  • • 50g valdespino vinegar
  • • Seasoning
  • Shallot puree
  • • 5 kg shallots, peeled, thinly slice
  • • 500g butter

Method

The sweet breads
Rinse the sweet breads well in fresh cold running water, pat dry on tissue, light season with fine salt, place breads into heavily iced water, and allow to sit into for 12 hour to pull out any blood.
Bring a large volume of water to a rapid boil, in small batch blanch the sweet breads, for 1 minute, and refresh in iced water. This sets the membrane and makes peeling easier, remove form the ice, peel, dry on tissue, and reserve for latter use. Sweet bread freeze very well.
Lemon confit/puree
Bring them lemons up to the boil, from cold fresh water. Repeat a total of 10 times.
Place lemon into a cook bag, add stock syrup to cover, SV. Cook at 85c for 6hrs. Cool
Puree
Blend a confit lemon to a smooth puree. Balance the flavour with Salt, sugar, Jerez vinegar.
Turkey Jus
Pre heat Frima to 220c, add the oil, then add the turkey leg, cook over a high heat, colouring the meat, but DONOT allow to burn! Cook until evenly gold brown on all sides. Once coloured turn heat down to 180c, add onion, thyme, garlic, cook for 10 minutes, lightly colouring the onion. Turn to Frima to boil, 98c, add 1L of water to deglaze the pan, stir well, add the stock, top up with water. Transfer to a pan, cook out for 1hr, pass though chinoise, reduce to correct constancy. To finish, After roasting the sweet breads, add fresh thyme to the butter, deglaze water & add turkey jus. Finish, chopped shallot, chives, lemon rind.
Candied Almonds
Add sugar, and water to a copper pan, bring to simmer, add the almonds. Cook to 105c in the sugar syrup. While cooking heat a fritura to 180c, (Take care oil expands by 4x volume when deep frying). Pass the nuts out the syrup and into the hot oil, deep fry until golden. Cool on parchment, season lightly with course sea salt. Halve or chop to a powder.
Caramelised Shallot vinaigrette
Heat the oil in a wide copper pan, add the shallots, along with a little seasoning. Cook slow on the side of the stove until golden brown and evenly caramelised, 1hr+. Add the vinegar, bring to a boil. Cool, and reserve for later use
Shallot puree
Heat a wide, heavy based pan, melt the butter, and allow to foam, add the shallots, season well, cook over a high heat for 5 minutes, stirring. Lower the heat, and cook until the shallot are evenly golden brown, add a splash of water, blend and pass. Adjust seasoning and acidity to finish. Trim the PSB, removing the big leaves and excess stalk, ,blanch the broccoli stems in boiling salted water until tended, refresh in ice
Deep fry the leaf at 140, until crisp, season.

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