Market Report - UK Seasonal update 6 May 2013

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 7th May 2013

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

In association with

  Hello all, I am chomping at the bit for Summer produce…so here’s a sketch of “signature” Wild Harvest plant and fungal lines due to kick off in the months of May, June and July. They’ll be some impromptu new additions to keep our updates fuelled for sure, but here’s what’s likely to happen throughout the month…

Forecasted .....

May
  • Summer truffles from Italy get cheaper and better.
  • Spring mushrooms dominate - morels, mousseron & St George. Girolles from Bulgaria are likely by month end.
  • The wild garlic at the bottom of my garden is about to flower, a nice edible bonus. They look stunning set in gelatine.
  • We open up our edible flower and cress options to include spectacular black pansies, borage flowers, marigolds (not the rubber kind) nasturtiums and roses.
  • Cress options improve yet again from a Sussex farm (well within the magic 100 miles away from London).
  • By the end of the month we will be offering coeur de pigeon tomatoes from the south of France and tomato quality and variety in general will strengthen.
  • Wild strawberries and Mara des bois strawberries from Kent all to start by month end.
  • Wild asparagus will join the asparagus party and prices will drop throughout the range as we hit peak season.
  • Jersey royals continue with a price drop as we get into the outdoor crop.
  • The return of the very popular ice radish - like a baby mooli or daikon really.
  • Spruce shoots & delicious sweet cicely from the Scottish wilds.
  • Champagne rhubarb from the Wye Valley remains strong.
  • Peas & broad beans get cheaper and sweeter.
  • The baby beetroot varieties open up to include golden and candy.
  • Genuine Charentais melons begin and we dip our toe into buying the first basic peaches, nectarines, apricots and cherries at the end of the month.
 June
  • Summer truffles from Italy get cheaper and better.
  • Spring mushrooms continue but it’s now all about perfect girolles.
  • Berry and stone fruit quality improves and odd varieties become available such as flat peaches, rainier cherries, white strawberries, strawberries, golden raspberries etc.
  • We are likely to see the first fresh gooseberries and British blackcurrants.
  • Wet almonds will appear and decent poivrade artichokes start.
  • Oca tubers restart & we focus heavily on exotic salad leaves such as ficoide and metisse.
  • Yellow and purple baby carrots become available.
 July
  • Summer truffles from Italy get cheaper and better
  • Scottish girolles join the wild mushroom party. Morels and St George are but a memory now, but mousseron should cling on.
  • Blood aka vine peaches and nectarines join the stone fruit brigade and wonderful greengage and mirabelle plums start at the end of July.
  • Fresh pulses bounce to us in the form of borlotti and coco.
  • The wild offering goes nuts with the likes of hogweed, rock samphire, wild fennel, wild pea flowers and elderflowers. Sweet cicely seed pods are being picked.
  • The first hint of Autumn sneaks in with the cropping of coloured cauliflowers.

Actuals .....

Wild Mushrooms MV has just got off the phone to one of Rungis biggest mushroom wholesalers. Bear in mind all they really sell are wild mushrooms. Nothing to offer whatsoever. Worst situation in 10 years of trading. The natural conclusion of the US & Portugeuse seasons coupled with 32 degrees of heat in Bulgaria and Turkey have spoilt everyone’s fun. Good job we have more strings to our bow than a lively cellist. Next week we fight for scraps until temperatures cool. South African ceps and Bulgarian morels secured for Tuesday 1st. Truffles Summer truffle prices will drop by Wednesday and quality improves. Fruits Venezuelan mangoes are a fine substitute for disappointing alfonsos. Gariguettes improve and supply is steady. Vegetables The very popular ice radish or baby daikon/mooli returns to our shores. Baby purple and candied (aka choggia) beet also joins the party. One of my top 10 foraged goods, sweet cicely, is a week off from the fresh air of the Scottish Highlands. Use the sweet aniseed flavour from the stalk to sweeten rhubarb, the leaf fronds for elegant garnish and towards the end of the season the seed pods as a spice for fish dishes. Just got hold of a very throaty French lady who informs me they are waiting each day for wild asparagus, and expect to see it next week. I left her to finish her filter-less cigarette.

New Sicoly Lines

Bergamot puree We love this flavour at Wild Harvest, and deal with the citrus derived Earl Grey tea botanical in many forms. This natural unsweetened puree is a welcome tangy addition. Lemon juice Use it where you would lemon juice. Far more convenient and stable flavour-wise than a non frozen version. Here’s a lift from the website:- SICOLY’s frozen pure pressed lemon juice is made from lemons grown in Spain. They are harvested ripe and then pressed in situ in order to achieve optimum quality. The juice is then heat treated by an ultra-fast process in order to conserve all the organoleptic qualities. It is then packaged. Crushed lemon For when you need the zesty flavour of the whole lemon such as a classic tarte citron. SICOLY’s frozen and sweetened crushed lemon purée is made from trimmed lemons that are crushed whole, producing a very pulped and textured fruit purée containing lemon zest. The trimmed lemons are selected and then processed into fruit purée here in our production facilities. Raspberry and exotic fruit coulis Once defrosted ready to pipe on the plate. Exotic fruit contains 92% mango and passion fruit. Raspberry contains 85% raspberry The missing %’s are made up of just enough sugar to enhance the flavour and xanthan gum to thicken your artistic swirls. Have a great week

In these challenging times…

The Staff Canteen team are taking a different approach to keeping our website independent and delivering content free from commercial influence. Our Editorial team have a critical role to play in informing and supporting our audience in a balanced way. We would never put up a paywall and restrict access – The Staff Canteen is open to all and we want to keep bringing you the content you want; more from younger chefs, more on mental health, more tips and industry knowledge, more recipes and more videos. We need your support right now, more than ever, to keep The Staff Canteen active. Without your financial contributions this would not be possible.

Over the last 12 years, The Staff Canteen has built what has become the go-to platform for chefs and hospitality professionals. As members and visitors, your daily support has made The Staff Canteen what it is today. Our features and videos from the world’s biggest name chefs are something we are proud of. We have over 500,000 followers across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and other social channels, each connecting with chefs across the world. Our editorial and social media team are creating and delivering engaging content every day, to support you and the whole sector - we want to do more for you.

A single coffee is more than £2, a beer is £4.50 and a large glass of wine can be £6 or more.

Support The Staff Canteen from as little as £1 today. Thank you.

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 7th May 2013

Market Report - UK Seasonal update 6 May 2013

IN ASSOCIATION WITH