Aneurin Bevan for better steak by Andrew Sheridan

Andrew Sheridan

Andrew Sheridan

13th September 2018

Aneurin Bevan for better steak by Andrew Sheridan

Aneurin Bevan for better steak by Andrew Sheridan - this was Andrew's meat dish in the Wales heat on Great British Menu.

Aneurin Bevan ( 15 November 1897 – 6 July 1960), often known as Nye Bevan, was a Welsh Labour Party politician who was the Minister for Health in the post-war Attlee ministry from 1945-51. The son of a coal miner, Bevan was a lifelong champion of social justice, rights of working people and democratic socialism.[1] He was a long-time Member of Parliament (MP), representing Ebbw Vale in Wales for 31 years.. His most famous accomplishment came when, as Minister of Health, he spearheaded the establishment of the National Health Service, which was to provide medical care free at point-of-need to all Britons.

Ingredients

  • Sous vide beef ribeye
  • · 3 ribeye, weighing 350g each thick cut
  • · 150g of beef dripping, rendered
  • · icing sugar, for dusting
  • · 50g of beef dripping, rendered
  • · Icing sugar, for dusting
  • Ribeye brine
  • · 1l water
  • · 200g of soft brown sugar
  • · 200g of sea salt
  • · 20g of black peppercorns
  • · 20g of coriander seeds
  • · 15g of fresh thyme
  • · 3 garlic cloves
  • Beef Cheeks
  • 4 big beef cheeks
  • 25g of butter
  • 10g of toasted hay
  • Chicken glace 500ml reduced
  • Charred leek purée
  • · 4 white leeks
  • · 1 tbsp of squid ink
  • · 1 tbsp of miso paste
  • · 1 dash of soy sauce
  • Confit garlic
  • · 100g of garlic, peeled
  • · 1g of sea salt, Maldon
  • · 5g of lemon thyme
  • · 15g of butter
  • · 50ml of olive oil
  • · 30g of honey
  • Verbena and pear juice
  • 100ml of pear juice
  • 10 big leaves of verbena
  • Pear Sheets
  • Verbena and pear juice from above 4 green and firm pears a Japanese vegetable cutter
  • Coal oil
  • 500ml rapeseed Oil
  • 6 pieces of charcoal
  • Charcoal chimney starter
  • Turnip and lovage juice
  • Turnip thinning x 20 leaves
  • 200g lovage of lovage leaves
  • Charred onions
  • 18 pearl onions
  • 30ml olive oil
  • Salsify
  • · 2 sticks of salsify root
  • · 100ml of port
  • · 125ml of red wine
  • · 100ml of chicken stock
  • · thyme
  • · salt
  • · pepper
  • Raisin purée
  • · 200g raisins
  • · 20g capers
  • · 100g water
  • · 100g port
  • · 1 bay leaf
  • · salt
  • · freshly ground black pepper
  • Turnip and lovage juice
  • Turnip thinning x 20 leaves
  • 200g lovage of lovage leaves
  • To finish
  • 50g raisins soaked in tea
  • 50g Lilliput capers
  • Nasturtium leaf and red nasturtium flowers
  • Turnip leaves x 5 micro
  • Fermented turnip
  • Burnt onion powder

Method

Preheat a water bath to 55˚C
Remove the beef from the brine and rinse under cold water. Add to a vacuum bag with the beef dripping and seal in a chamber sealer. Cook in the water bath for 30mins
When the beef is ready, remove from the bags and dust the flesh with icing sugar, without sugaring the fat
Place a large pan over a high heat and once hot, add the beef. Caramelise the flesh until very dark in colour and the sugar almost burns. Once the flesh is blackened, place the beef fat-side down and gently caramelise the fat until it's a lovely golden colour
Remove the beef from the pan and allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving
Mix together all the brine ingredients in a large pan and bring to the boil. Once boiling, remove from the heat and chill immediately.
Once chilled, add the Ribeye to the brine and set aside for 1h15mins
Take the membranes off the cheeks and trim them. Seal in a vacuum bag with the butter and hay and cook in a water tank for 24 hours at 72c. Cool down and remove the hay. Portion the cheeks and roast them with butter and thyme. Pour the fat off and add a tiny amount of butter and then glacé the meat with chicken glacé.
For the charred leek purée, cut the leeks in half lengthways and wash thoroughly. Use a very hot chargrill pan to blacken the leeks on both sides, then remove from the heat, trim down slightly and scatter evenly on the base of a saucepan
Add enough water to just cover (200-300ml), bring to a boil and simmer until the liquid has reduced and the pan is almost dry. Transfer to a high-speed blender and blitz with the squid ink, a dash of soy sauce and the miso paste
Once the purée is very smooth, press through a fine strainer, transfer to a squeezy bottle
For the confit garlic, place the oil in a pan over a medium heat, add the butter, then the garlic and salt. Colour the garlic for approximately 10 minutes until golden, then add the honey and thyme. Cook slowly for 8-10 minutes until tender
Blend the juice and verbena together and strain. Keep cold
Seconds before serving, push equal part of turnip leaves and lovage through a juicer straight into a bowl with some Coal oil already in it. because it forms a film on top of the delicate juice, which without it would oxidize in seconds.
Peel the onions and cut them in halves. Burn them with a blowtorch and seal them in a vacuum pouch with the olive oil. Cook at 83C for 11 minutes. Finally, cool and store in the fridge.
Peel the onions and cut them in halves. Burn them with a blowtorch and seal them in a vacuum pouch with the olive oil. Cook at 83C for 11 minutes. Finally, cool and store in the fridge.
Add the port, red wine and chicken stock to a saucepan and place over a medium heat with a pinch of thyme. Peel the salsify and poach in the liquid until tender. Remove the salsify and reduce the liquor by half to create the glaze. When ready to serve, pour the glaze over the salsify.
Meanwhile, make the raisin purée. Place all the ingredients in a pan over a medium heat, then cover the pan with cling film and leave to gently simmer for 20 minutes
Seconds before serving, push equal part of turnip leaves and lovage through a juicer straight into a bowl with some Coal oil already in it. because it forms a film on top of the delicate juice, which without it would oxidize in seconds.

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