British Sausage Week: How do you like your sausage?

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 30th October 2014

In association with

Bisto logo

 

          British Sausage Week is an annual celebration of the taste, quality and diversity of the traditional British Banger. From sausage dishes around the world to the quality of British sausage meat, we have lots to shout about – but how do you like your sausage? When it comes to sausage dishes, there are some that spring immediately to mind. But sausages are not limited to the conventional. In honour of British Sausage Week, here is a list of things that can be done with British bangers – some traditional, some unusual, all worth trying. Bangers and mash image credit BBC Good Food (Great British banger piece)With mash Was there ever a better suited couple than bangers and mash? This simple staple has been around for centuries, gaining popularity as a cheap but filling working class meal. It is best with traditional British sausages, perhaps with your regional variety of choice, and a serving of thick onion gravy.   Glazed The marriage of sausage flavours and textures with a sticky sweet glaze makes a winning dish. Honey alone is a popular choice, as is the combination of honey and mustard. International flavours are more than welcome here, too – honey and hoisin would make a taste-rich glaze. Roast or barbecue large glazed sausages for a delicious meal, or use chipolatas and cocktail sticks for snacking and sharing. Don’t forget to provide some dipping sauces.   With pasta Who said bangers belong to British cuisine? Pasta is wonderfully diverse, and as this list shows, so are sausages. Whether you’re looking for a quick lunch or a bubbling family bake, you should find a winner with this combination. Sausages in a pasta dish can be sliced, diced, or even crumbled – with it being so succulent, sausage meat makes a good ingredient on its own. It is a simple process of slicing a sausage’s skin open before removing the inner meat, which can then be crumbled and pan fried before serving on pasta or between sheets of lasagne. It makes an interesting alternative to minced beef, and is flavoursome enough without sauce. It doesn’t have to stop at pasta dishes. Crumbled sausage meat can be used to stuff vegetables such as mushrooms and peppers, or can be reworked into patties with other meats and spices.   In a casserolesausage casserole image credit BBC (how do you like piece) Casseroles present boundless opportunities. Whether you plan on slaving over a hot stove or bunging something in a slow cooker and leaving it to cook itself, sausages can easily find a home in a casserole. Beans and lentils add texture – you could try beans with red wine and sausage, or perhaps a warming mix of peppers, paprika, sausage and chorizo. Sausages also go well with mushrooms, and a creamy casserole could accommodate the pairing well.   sausage and leek pie image credit BBC Good Food (how do you like piece)In pastry When it comes to pastry, it is difficult to run out of options. Pies make a warming comfort dinner, be they puff or short crust pastry. In terms of filling, you could try sausage pieces with leeks in a mustard sauce, or perhaps with cheese and onion. Sausages could even be teamed with apples for a hearty filling – after all, the South West’s signature pork and apple sausage is a great success. If you’re a fan of quiche, crumbled sausage meat makes a nice variety. The possibilities are almost endless. On the subject of pastry, it would be wrong to forget that party buffet favourite, the sausage roll. This simple template leaves much room for creativity. The pastry can be decorated, for example woven to transform your roll into a plait. Or, to add a new dimension of flavour and texture, a thick sauce such as cranberry could be dolloped between the sausage meat and the pastry before baking.   For breakfastfull english breakfast image credit Telegraph (how do you like piece) Dating back to the 1800s, the traditional full English breakfast is a favourite for many, and can involve any sausage you want – including black pudding. For the full works add bacon, hash browns, eggs, and extras such as tomato, mushroom, baked beans and toast. Breakfast doesn’t have to stay conventional; the combination of sausage and egg can also be reimagined in many ways. Inspiration could be taken from a Turkish dish of spicy sausage slices fried with eggs. Or sausages can be taken down the French route – crumbled sausage meat makes a for flavoursome omelette.   With hair The haired sausage’s name is not appealing, and the jury is still out on whether the sight of it is either. But for lovers of spaghetti and sausages alike it could well be wonderful. Originating from Russia, the recipe for a haired sausage – thankfully containing no real hair – has spread rapidly online. It involves spearing a sausage with uncooked spaghetti sticks, before boiling the whole thing until the spaghetti is cooked and it looks like the sausage has grown long hair. The novel effect lends this dish the potential to become a children’s favourite.   Toad in the Hole (how do you like piece)In a hole As peculiar as toad in the hole may sound, its popularity cannot be disputed. It is a traditional British dinner, consisting of two national favourites – sausage and Yorkshire pudding. Best complemented by gravy and roast vegetables, toad in the hole is usually bulky and seldom perfectly-shaped, but it is a true comfort food.   For dessert Though it may conjure images of a birthday cake with sausages for candles, in reality the dish comes from a Native American recipe. It incorporates flavours of cinnamon, cloves, ginger and dried fruits with sausage meat in a dense sponge. Its legacy has echoed into the modern day, with breakfast fare such as sausage and blueberry cake becoming more popular. Whether it suits your palate is up to you. By Julia Watts To celebrate British Sausage Week, running 3rd - 9th of November, Bisto is launching a competition that will give chefs the opportunity to win £500 worth of high street vouchers and a full set of professional kitchen knives. To be in with a chance of winning these exciting prizes, simply download our brand new online recipe guide, which showcases the versatility of Bisto and the traditional British banger simply click the link for more details http://ow.ly/CTXG5

In these challenging times…

The Staff Canteen team are taking a different approach to keeping our website independent and delivering content free from commercial influence. Our Editorial team have a critical role to play in informing and supporting our audience in a balanced way. We would never put up a paywall and restrict access – The Staff Canteen is open to all and we want to keep bringing you the content you want; more from younger chefs, more on mental health, more tips and industry knowledge, more recipes and more videos. We need your support right now, more than ever, to keep The Staff Canteen active. Without your financial contributions this would not be possible.

Over the last 12 years, The Staff Canteen has built what has become the go-to platform for chefs and hospitality professionals. As members and visitors, your daily support has made The Staff Canteen what it is today. Our features and videos from the world’s biggest name chefs are something we are proud of. We have over 500,000 followers across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and other social channels, each connecting with chefs across the world. Our editorial and social media team are creating and delivering engaging content every day, to support you and the whole sector - we want to do more for you.

A single coffee is more than £2, a beer is £4.50 and a large glass of wine can be £6 or more.

Support The Staff Canteen from as little as £1 today. Thank you.

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 30th October 2014

British Sausage Week: How do you like your sausage?