Easter traditions and treats

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 23rd March 2015

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Logo Easter in the UK is filled with many traditions and customs, particularly when it comes to food. It is argued that Easter traditions date back to before Christianity as the word “Easter” is believed to be named after the Anglo-Saxan goddess Eostre, goddess of spring. Therefore Spring time treats such as hot cross buns and chocolate nests are perfect for Easter with nothing saying more Spring than a lamb roast served on Easter Sunday.hot cross buns Traditional foods that are consumed over the Easter period include the deliciously humble hot cross bun. The cross on the bun, made with a plain flour paste, symbolises Jesus’ death and is traditionally eaten on Good Friday. There are many superstitions when it comes to eating it, English folklore says that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or grow mouldy during the subsequent year. PWG_WEB_1555Sharing a hot cross bun with another is also supposed to ensure friendship throughout the coming year, particularly if "Half for you and half for me, between us two shall goodwill be" is said at the time (apparently). The most commonly eaten treat on Easter Sunday is the chocolate egg. The egg symbolises new life, which is prevalent in both Christian and Pagan traditions. Chocolate eggs have been given to children as a treat in the UK since the late 1800s. The first chocolate egg to be produced in the UK was by Bristolian chocolatier, J.S. Fry, in 1873 – with Cadbury’s following suit a year later. Before this, new life was symbolised by the painting of eggs; to be given as gifts to loved ones. Simnel cake is another sweet treat that is traditionally eaten during the Easter period. Consisting of fruit cake, a layer of marzipan on top and then twelve marzipan balls, made to represent the twelve apostles, around the outside. This tradition developed late in the Victorian era, altering the mid Victorian tradition of decorating the cakes with preserved fruits and flowers.Simnel cake credit to the BBC In today’s society, it is commonplace that a roast is served on Easter Sunday. This roast often features lamb, which dates back to Passover alongside ancient Egyptian and Jewish traditions although a survey by Premier Foods revealed that fish is the second most popular dish to be served on Easter Sunday.

For menu costing ideas by Premier Foods click here

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The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 23rd March 2015

Easter traditions and treats