Mother’s Day traditions and treats

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 9th March 2015

In association with

Logo Mother’s Day in the UK is a celebration that dates back to around the 16th Century. Celebrated across the globe and in different religions, each country and faith have their own traditions and culinary treats that come with it. The UK tradition of Mother’s Day originates from religious practice in Catholicism and other Christian denominations. On “Mothering Sunday,” the fourth Sunday of Lent, those of faith were to attend the Mother Church (the largest church in the area or nearest cathedral) for the Laetare service.Decorated_Simnel_cake_ James E. Petts credit When children and young people were sent away to work they would be reunited with their mothers for the first time in a year on Laetare or Mothering Sunday. Over time this tradition saw the giving of gifts and the praising of Mother Mary in Church services. Children presented mothers with flowers and cakes on Mothering Sunday as a sign of love and respect. As the industrial revolution swept over Britain, the practise of churchgoing on Mothering Sunday subsided, yet the fourth Sunday of Lent was still reserved as a day for mothers. This year it is celebrated on Sunday, March 15th. In present day, the UK has followed American traditions, naming the day Mother’s Day, giving material gifts and spending the day to feast and celebrate. One culinary delight that is traditionally synonymous with Mothering Sunday, or Mother’s Day, is the Simnel cake. In today’s culture, the dense and fruity Simnel cake is more linked with Easter traditions, however its origins lie with Mothering Sunday. The cake is a traditional, rich, zesty fruit cake made and constructed with two layers of almond paste, or marzipan. It is decorated with 11 marzipan balls on the top, each representing one of Jesus’ disciples (minus Judas). Children would often dress the cake with sugar and wild violets to make a presentable gift for their mother. Brunch, credit to Geoff PetersMore recently, breakfast in bed and brunch dishes are becoming increasingly popular on Mother’s Day, whether a traditional English breakfast is on the menu, or lighter options grace the lap-tray. Brunch is sometimes served with champagne for a luxurious treat. A traditional afternoon tea is also becoming a British Mother’s Day custom for some. The indulgence that comes with a dainty selection of pastries and crusts-off finger sandwiches, citrusy possets and handmade scones makes for a wonderful celebratory treat. According to research by Premier Foods, the most popular dish to be served on Mother’s Day is a good old fashioned Sunday roast. 55% of consumers wish to dine out on Mother’s Day and 39% would like to see more traditional meals on the Mother’s Day menu. Whether it’s dining out or cooking a marvelous meal for mum, it seems tradition is the way to go. For menu costing ideas by Premier Foods click here By Ashley Chalmers

In these challenging times…

The Staff Canteen team are taking a different approach to keeping our website independent and delivering content free from commercial influence. Our Editorial team have a critical role to play in informing and supporting our audience in a balanced way. We would never put up a paywall and restrict access – The Staff Canteen is open to all and we want to keep bringing you the content you want; more from younger chefs, more on mental health, more tips and industry knowledge, more recipes and more videos. We need your support right now, more than ever, to keep The Staff Canteen active. Without your financial contributions this would not be possible.

Over the last 12 years, The Staff Canteen has built what has become the go-to platform for chefs and hospitality professionals. As members and visitors, your daily support has made The Staff Canteen what it is today. Our features and videos from the world’s biggest name chefs are something we are proud of. We have over 500,000 followers across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and other social channels, each connecting with chefs across the world. Our editorial and social media team are creating and delivering engaging content every day, to support you and the whole sector - we want to do more for you.

A single coffee is more than £2, a beer is £4.50 and a large glass of wine can be £6 or more.

Support The Staff Canteen from as little as £1 today. Thank you.

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 9th March 2015

Mother’s Day traditions and treats