Sausages: Size doesn’t matter, it’s what’s inside that counts

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 5th November 2015
Supported by Bisto, a proud supporter of British Sausage week. Bisto logoFrom 2-8 November Great Britain celebrates its national Sausage Week organised by pig farmers from the Big Pig Executive. It’s a great opportunity to celebrate the best sausages from the best quality meats and trusted sources. This year’s theme, Sausages of Distinction brings a touch of class to proceedings and highlights the oh so delightful and chic dishes that can be made from our favourite porky treats. Now in its 18th year, renowned chef Michel Roux Jnr is leading the way in celebrating the highest quality pork sausages from around the country. The Michelin starred chef is a true sausage aficionado and is delighted to be involved, he told lovepork.co.uk: “I have always enjoyed experimenting with classic dishes and ingredients, without compromising on quality – with sausages you can do so much. It’s time to rethink the humble banger and look beyond mash and gravy to give sausages a bit of the Michelin-star treatment!” With gourmet versions of everyday foods becoming increasingly popular, this year’s seven-day sausage festival will focus on quite simply sausages made lovingly using high quality ingredients – such as assured pork – for a delectable taste sensations. It’s not just the British that love a good sausage, all European countries can be proud of their signature sausages too, from the Italian chipolatas to the German bratwurst. However, not everything about the sausage we know and love is what it seems. To celebrate Sausage Week and treat ourselves with the best of the best, we look into the dark side of sausages.Flickr Chiefy OR Christopher Najewicz Let’s be honest, no one thinks that eating a sausage is the healthy option. In recent years, the question has been raised as to how bad sausages actually are for our health. But all hope is not lost, as ‘real’ sausages are a source of protein, iron and vitamin B-12. So don’t be too hasty and throw away those juicy Cumberlands just yet. Thankfully, Britain’s most popular sausages, Cumberland, Gloucester and Oxford contain just a few ingredients finely minced together. The traditional sausages are made from good quality pork or beef, seasoning such as salt, pepper, sage and onion or fresh herbs and sometimes breadcrumbs. There has been very bad press surrounding the production of sausage in the last few years, and unfortunately in some points, it’s hard to disagree. Flickr kriztofor OR Christopher CraigSome manufacturers sell sausages full of fillers including water, pork fat, rusk, potato starch, soya protein, sodium, antioxidants, preservatives and artificial colours. Meaning that your cheap ‘sausage’ alternative contains around 35% real meat. Whereas the optimum sausage contains at least 70% meat. More meat will always mean there are less fats and preservatives in the sausage. Typically, the best quality sausage will put a bit more of a dent in your pocket but the question is; is it better to look after your health or your wallet? When looking out for ingredients it’s always good to check if the meat is labelled as ‘reared outdoors’. If the packet doesn’t specify that, there is a risk that it could come from non-fair-trade farms. Sausage Week was invented to promote the best British Bangers which carry the ‘British Meat Quality Standards’ mark. Thankfully, there are still plenty of trusted butchers nationwide who follow regional recipes, and are proud to produce the best traditional British sausages – from real meat! By Anna Miller

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The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Editor 5th November 2015

Sausages: Size doesn’t matter, it’s what’s inside that counts