February seasonal update

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Other 1st February 2019

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

From seasonal vegetables to game and seasonal fruits, read our monthly market report to find out what ingredients are perfect for your February menus. 

Scallops - what to look for and how to use them 

Look for dry scallops, not wet ones: make sure they aren't treated with  sodium tripolyphosphate (STP), commonly added to increase their permeability, as this stops them from searing properly. 

Scallops need to have a white to light pink tinge, and must smell of the sea - not fishy! Scallops should be firm, and bounce back when touched. 

Koppert Cress suggests pairing scallops with BlinQ Blossom®

BlinQ Blossom is the Koppert Cress brand name for a type of edible flower. It is a robust, juicy plant with a crystalline appearance. It is fresh, briny and salty. Originating from South Africa, the plant is found in dry, rocky areas. It has a soothing effect and is traditionally used to inhibit inflammation of the mucous membranes.

Scallop recipes 

Scallops
Seared scallops, black pudding, cauliflower and spiced golden raisins by Jonathan MacDonald

 

Why not try Ashley Palmer Watts' sherried scallops, Jonathan MacDonalds' seared scallops with black pudding, cauliflower and spiced golden raisins or Michael Caines' pan-fried scallops with caramelised cauliflower purée, soused cauliflower florets, cumin velouté and sweet raisin vinaigrette? 

Watch 2 Michelin-star chef Hélène Darroze create tandoori scallops, sweetbread and lobster pithivier for more inspiration:

 

Gurnard - what it is and why you should use it 

 

This lean, firm, white fish of the sea robin family is an abundant species. It is particularly plentiful on the Cornish coastline and west of Brittany, and can be found throughout the northeast Atlantic from South Norway and north of the British Isles to Mauritania.

It makes great soups and stock, and can be prepared whole, though it can be quite bony. 

Of six known species in European waters, red gurnard is the most common. 

Koppert Cress suggests pairing gurnard with Ghoa cress 

Ghoa cress has the fragrance of mild coriander (cilantro). This micro vegetable works well with poultry, game and fish. It also makes a good garnish for soups and salads.

Most people are unaware of this, but the seedpod can also be used. Named after its Indian origin - as in Goa, the city on the country's west coast - where it is readily used in all kinds of dishes as curry in salads, soups, meat, poultry and sauces. 

red gurnard, or grondin rouge
red gurnard, or grondin rouge

 

Guinea fowl - How to use it more and what to look out for 

 

One of the world's oldest gallinaceous birds, the Guinea fowl is native to Africa, and was brought to Europe by Portuguese merchants in the 16th century. The most common type found in Europe is the helmeted guinea fowl.

While young guinea fowl can be cooked quickly, older birds tend to be tougher, and thus are better suited to stews and casseroles. 

Koppert Cress suggests pairing Guinea fowl with shiso purple

Otherwise known as shiso perilla, shiso purple is widely used in Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese cuisine. Its taste is slightly reminiscent of cumin.

It can be used in a variety of dishes and makes for an aesthetically pleasing, colourful garnish. It tastes best when combined with wild mushrooms or Guinea fowl.

Guinea fowl recipes 

Guinea fowl
Guinea Fowl & Squid Broth, Peas And Sweetcorn by Steve Drake

 

 

Why not try Steve Drake's Guinea fowl and squid broth with peas and sweetcorn; David Wilson's braised supreme of free range Guinea fowl, or Ricardo Soares' Guinea fowl and pear terrine

How do you prepare purple sprouting broccoli?

Purple sprouting broccoli comes good in February for only a short period, so make the most of this curiously purple and thinner stemmed version of broccoli. They can be prepared like normal broccoli and the doused in butter and lemon juice for an alternative starter to asparagus, just be careful not to overcook them. 

Watch chef Luke Holder creates a pasta recipe with purple sprouting broccoli:

How can I make the most of blood oranges?

The blood orange, which gets its name from the crimson colour of the flesh, are cultivated and on the market in February and March. They are an excellent source of vitamin C and can be baked in tarts, used in salads or even made into ice cream or sorbets, which is what is served alongside this almond opera cake.

See how to create chef Arnaud Stevens hake with blood orange - recipe here

What goes well with wild salmon?

Although farmed salmon is available throughout the year, wild salmon only appears on the market starting in February to March. One of the most popular food fishes, salmon has high levels of protein, fatty acids and vitamins which are all essential to our diet. This recipe pairs the fish with cucumber, honey and soy vinaigrette - See how to create this dish for yourself here

16 39 39 754 River Dart Wild Salmon Oscietra caviar salmon jelly and cucumber honey soy and wasabi and Greek yogurt vinaigrette
River Dart wild salmon, Oscietra caviar, salmon jelly, cucumber, honey & soy vinaigrette, wasabi & Greek yoghurt vinaigrette

 

What sauces go well with mussels?

Easy to cook, delicious and sustainable, mussels are also one of the most versatile types of shellfish you can buy. From cream and parsley based sauces to recipes that utilise smokey onion and ancho chilli, there are so many different ways to maximise mussels which are in season in February.

Why not try Chard Byrne's recipe for Cromane mussels or watch  Arnaud Stevens cook his recipe for mussels with suckling pig belly, hake with blood orange.


Are you using any of these ingredients in your menus, let us know over on @canteentweets or our Facebook page. Look out for our seasonal update next month to see what's in season.

Are you using any of these seasonal ingredients in your menus? Upload your pics and recipes to our Chef+ mobile app!

The Staff Canteen App

About Koppert Cress

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Koppert Cress

KoppertCress is a producer of innovative, and food-safe living micro-vegetables, specialities and cresses, our seedlings come from unique plants, each having their own specific effects on the senses either for Flavour, fragrance, feel or just presentation! This Collection is presented as Architecture Aromatique'. Servicing the International and global gastronomy. KoppertCress enables the best Chefs to be the best!

Plant Power using Nature to Nurture! 

Follow them here: 

www.twitter.com/koppertcressuk 

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www.facebook.com/Koppert.Cress.Middle.East/ 

www.instagram.com/koppertcress/

 

The  Staff Canteen

The Staff Canteen

Other 1st February 2019

February seasonal update

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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