Har gao with sweet and sour rice vinegar foam

Andrew Wong

Andrew Wong

16th March 2017

Har gao with sweet and sour rice vinegar foam

As part of The Staff Canteen Live, Andrew Wong will be cooking har gao with sweet and sour rice vinegar foam ⁣for his demonstration ⁣at IFE 2017 - supported by Westlands. ⁣You can register here: www.ife.co.uk/tsc

Ingredients

  • For the har gao prawn:
  • 250g peeled raw prawns
  • 20g white vegetable fat
  • 15g sugar
  • 5g potato starch
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 5g salt
  • Pinch of white pepper to taste
  • 75ml ginger and spring onion water made from the trimmings of fresh root ginger and spring onion crushed with the side of a large knife and mixed with water.
  • For the har gao pastry:
  • 110g wheat starch
  • 110g tapioca flour
  • 70g potato starch
  • About 200ml boiling water
  • 50ml vegetable oil
  • For the rice vinegar foam:
  • 200ml rice vinegar
  • 100ml water
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp soya lecithin
  • Sweet chilli sauce to serve (one of the really brightly coloured varieties as a mark of respect to the neon takeaway versions)

Method

For the har gao prawn:
Place all ingredients into an electric stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and knead for 10 minutes (the dough hook binds the ingredients together without turning the mixture into a puree, which a blender would do). Remove from mixer and refrigerate until ready to use, clean mixer.
For the har gao pastry:
Follow the instructions on page 27 of Andrew's book, A. Wong ‑ The Cookbook, to form the pastry skins and wrap the filling. Steam the dumplings over a high heat for 5 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches 60°c.
For the rice vinegar foam:
Warm all of the ingredients in a pan and then blend with a stick blender until a foam forms.
To serve, brush the dumplings lightly with sweet chilli sauce and cover each with a tablespoon of foam before serving.
Chef’s tip:
One thing that I have learned over the years making this pastry is that if you undercook the dough when adding the boiling water and it doesn’t have any elasticity, you can wrap it up in cling film and steam it for a minute before attempting to knead it again. But if you have overcooked the dough, save yourself the aggravation of trying to force dumpling skins out of it; throw the batch away and start again adding the water a little slower this time.