Rosti

Kevin Kindland

Kevin Kindland

21st February 2014

Rosti

Rösti is a Swiss dish consisting mainly of potatoes. It was originally a common breakfast eaten by farmers in the canton of Bern, but today is eaten all over Switzerland and also in many restaurants in the western world. Many Swiss people consider rösti a national dish. Today, rather than considering it a complete breakfast, it is more commonly served to accompany other dishes such as "Spinat und Spiegelei" (spinach and fried eggs, sunny side up), cervelas or Fleischkäse. It is also a dish one can order in most restaurants to replace the standard side dish of any given meal.

Rösti is made with coarsely grated potato, either cooked or raw. Depending on the frying technique, butter or another fat may be added (and usually salt and pepper). If not, oil is used for the frying. The grated potatoes are then shaped into rounds or patties, which come in different sizes, usually measuring between 3–12 cm (1 to 5 inches) in diameter and 1–2 cm (0.5 inch) thick. Often, rösti is simply shaped inside of the frying pan. They are most often pan-fried, but can also be baked in the oven. Although basic rösti consists of nothing but potato, a number of additional ingredients are sometimes added, such as bacon, onion, cheese, apple or fresh herbs. This is often considered to be a regional touch.

Ingredients

  • Desiree that will crisp up well.
  • Butter

Method

Peel potatoes, grate them Salt the strips and leave hanging in cloth for the liquid to drip out, then squeeze to get the potato strips as dry as possible. Mix the dried potatoes with clarified butter.
Divide between four galette moulds 7.5cm in diameter. Press down evenly and place the bottom of the mould over the heat. The heat must not be too high (or the base of the rosti will burn and the inside will not be cooked) or too low. Cook for 5-7 minutes altogether.

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